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Arizona Spotlight for August 11th, 2022

Native plants return to Hermosillo's urban landscape; Tucsonan John Rhodes tells about his family's rodeo history; Meet the new CEO of The Western National Parks Association; and a short story by Aurelie Sheehan.

What will Arizona do as its share of Colorado River water diminishes?

We hear about efforts to reassess state allocations and what may come of a billion-dollar fund established this summer.

A grassroots Tucson baker wins a national award for excellence.

Also on Arizona Spotlight: Renowned author Tom Miller reads from "Where Was I? A Travel Writer's Memoir"; Adiba Nelson shares truth about her first day on the job as a new mother; and remembering cowboy poet & philosopher Baxter Black.

Making beer in Southern Arizona

This week, The Buzz focuses on the area's beer business, its growth and how it has felt the pinch of supply chain problems.

$3.4B in produce came in through Nogales in 2021

After being slightly edged out by Hidalgo, Texas, for tomato imports in 2017, Nogales has maintained the top spot since then.

Arizona Spotlight for January 27th, 2022

With less water on the surface, how long can Arizona rely on what's underground? And, the Pima County Public Library's "Welcome to America Team" is helping Afghan immigrants to find their new home.

Adia Barnes on Teamwork and Motherhood.

Also on Arizona Spotlight:Can new technology save water on farms? Plus Chris Dashiell remembers Peter Bogdanovich, and a short story read by author Michelle Ross.

As the Colorado River shrinks, can new technology save water on farms? The answer is complicated

Agriculture uses about 80% of the water in the Colorado River basin.

The Dave Stryker Quartet kicks off the 2022 Tucson Jazz Festival.

Also on Arizona Spotlight: The Cocopah Indian Tribe work to restore the Colorado River Delta; How Maryanne Chisholm's artistic vision guided her through difficult times; and the Sonoran Plein Air Painters share "A Brush with the Desert".

Researcher: More could be done to protect farmworkers from COVID-19

For the study, more than 30 farm workers in Sonora and Baja California were interviewed from mid- to late-2020.

Drought monitors paint a bleak picture for the Colorado River

Four metrics are used to track drought, and they paint a bleak picture

Company to close pecan harvesting plant in southern Arizona

Farmers Investment Co. said processing pecans at the Sahuarita plant wasn't sustainable due to tariffs, low-cost competition from Mexican processors and financial impacts of COVID-19.

Arizona farmers prepare for water cuts

A third-generation farmer fears for the long-term sustainability of farming in Arizona.

Mexican tomato importers worry rule interpretation could raise prices

"This might add up to 20% to 25% of the Nogales shipping cost of tomatoes," industry group says

"Good Food Finder" wants to build roots between growers and consumers.

Also on Arizona Spotlight: Visit a place in the desert with more than a century of aviation history; current Tucson Museum of Art exhibition "4 x 4" celebrates Willie J. Bonner; more entries by 5th graders from The NPR Student Podcast Challenge.

No movement on groundwater protection bills

This year's efforts to bring more regulation to Arizona's groundwater use have failed in the state legislature.

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