/ Modified feb 6, 2019 3:53 p.m.

Lawmakers Look to Bolster Oversight of Care Facilities After Rape

The legislation would require certain facilities to apply for a license.

Hacienda HealthCare Google Street View image of a Hacienda HealthCare facility in Phoenix.

PHOENIX — Arizona may boost state oversight of long-term care facilities like the one in Phoenix where an incapacitated woman was raped and later gave birth.

State lawmakers are considering a bill to require intermediate care facilities like Hacienda Healthcare to apply for a state license, reversing a decision more than 20 years ago to drop state regulation of them. The 11 facilities in the state would also have to conduct background checks of employees who care for clients.

Gov. Doug Ducey on Wednesday ordered state agencies to improve protections for people with disabilities. His executive order will require employees at state-funded care facilities to undergo annual training in recognizing and preventing abuse and neglect. He'll also require that group homes and day programs prominently post signs about how to report abuse.

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