/ Modified may 2, 2017 6:20 a.m.

Trump Opposition Ties Groups Together for May Day March

Around 300 demonstrators made it to Armory Park.

May Day March Three hundred demonstrators marched from Tucson's south side to Armory Park, May 1, 2017. (PHOTO: AZPM Staff )

LISTEN

A group calling itself the "May Day Coalition” marched in Tucson to represent immigrants, women’s rights, education and workers rights.

An estimated 100 people gathered at El Casino Ballroom in South Tucson to make the mile and a half march to Armory Park in downtown Tucson.

There were activists with environmental concerns and groups worried about what they call an erosion of LGBT rights.

There were former teachers wanting to keep attention on public education funding in Arizona and there were union representatives concerned about minimum wage workers. The largest group at the May Day March was made up of human rights advocates marching to draw attention to the treatment of immigrants in Arizona.

The numbers of marchers grew to around 300 and were escorted by Tucson police, who closed South Fourth Avenue.

One of the march’s organizers was Eduardo Quintana, who said the common denominator for all the groups was opposition to Trump administration policies.

By posting comments, you agree to our
AZPM encourages comments, but comments that contain profanity, unrelated information, threats, libel, defamatory statements, obscenities, pornography or that violate the law are not allowed. Comments that promote commercial products or services are not allowed. Comments in violation of this policy will be removed. Continued posting of comments that violate this policy will result in the commenter being banned from the site.

By submitting your comments, you hereby give AZPM the right to post your comments and potentially use them in any other form of media operated by this institution.
Arizona Public Media broadcast stations are licensed to the Arizona Board of Regents. Arizona Public Media and AZPM are registered trademarks of the Arizona Board of Regents.
The University of Arizona