/ Modified apr 25, 2016 3 p.m.

US House Committee Further Protects A-10 from Retirement

Primary plane flown at Tucson’s Davis-Monthan Air Force Base safe until 2022.

A-10 from Davis-Monthan spotlight A-10s from Davis-Monthan Air Force Base taxi at March Air Reserve Base, California. February 1, 2016 (U.S. Air Force/Senior Airman Steven A. Ortiz)

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The new, National Defense Authorizations Act (NDAA) reiterates that the Air Force may not retire the A-10 airplane.

The A-10 is the primary plane flown at Tucson’s Davis-Monthan Air Force base.

The Air Force has tried to retire the A-10 as a cost-saving measure, but Congress has fought back.

This year, the Air Force relented and said the plane will fly until 2022.

The NDAA protects the A-10 if Air Force officials change their plans. The document says the Air Force may not “retire, prepare to retire, or place in storage any A-10 aircraft.”

It also requires the Air Force maintain 171 A-10 designated as “primary mission aircraft.”

Nearly half of the A-10 fleet is based at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base.

The NDAA faces votes in the full House and Senate.

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