/ Modified jun 10, 2015 4:50 a.m.

Arizona Fire Season Looks Bad, But Not Worst in West

El Niño weather makes Pacific Northwest and California more susceptible to fire.

Controlled Burn 4 'Fire does have a role in natural landscapes.' - Coronado National Forest Spokesperson Heidi Schewel (PHOTO: Zac Ziegler)

Listen:

LISTEN

A lack of snow and an abundance of dry vegetation on wild lands are priming Arizona for a severe fire season, federal officials said Tuesday.

But California and the Pacific Northwest might have it worse due to the weather patterns that caused late spring rains to hit Arizona.

“What’s referred to as El Niño– it’s brought up more moisture through the Southwest than we normally see," said U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell "But what also happens in an El Niño is you see much drier conditions up in the Pacific Northwest.”

A dry Pacific Coast could adversely affect Arizona's ability to fight fire this season.

Local fire officials said a busy season in other parts of the West could stretch resources thin across the region, leaving crews competing for the resources they need.

It could also lead the U.S. Forest Service and other public land agencies to borrow firefighting money from funds meant for fire prevention measures such as prescribed burns.

By posting comments, you agree to our
AZPM encourages comments, but comments that contain profanity, unrelated information, threats, libel, defamatory statements, obscenities, pornography or that violate the law are not allowed. Comments that promote commercial products or services are not allowed. Comments in violation of this policy will be removed. Continued posting of comments that violate this policy will result in the commenter being banned from the site.

By submitting your comments, you hereby give AZPM the right to post your comments and potentially use them in any other form of media operated by this institution.
Arizona Public Media broadcast stations are licensed to the Arizona Board of Regents. Arizona Public Media and AZPM are registered trademarks of the Arizona Board of Regents.
The University of Arizona