October 31, 2018 / Modified oct 31, 2018 4:29 p.m.

NASA Bids Farewell to Kepler, Pioneering Planet Hunter

After nine years and more than 500,000 stars observed, the space telescope is retiring.

Kepler render An artist's illustration of the Kepler telescope. (PHOTO: NASA)

After nine years and more than 500,000 stars observed, NASA's Kepler space telescope has run out of fuel and is embarking on a well-earned retirement.

Kepler's scientific contributions — and Earth-trailing solar orbit — ensure it will always have a place in the sun.

Launched on March 6, 2009, the planet hunter has spotted more than 2,600 worlds, many of them Earthlike and orbiting within habitable zones.

Kepler observed thousands of stars at once, looking for telltale dimming patterns caused by the passing of an orbiting planet.

Its data transformed scientific understanding of the planetary population of the galaxy, the characteristics of stars and how solar systems form.

Arizona Science Desk
This story is from the Arizona Science Desk, a collaborative of the state's public radio stations, including NPR 89.1. Read more from the Arizona Science Desk.
By posting comments, you agree to our
AZPM encourages comments, but comments that contain profanity, unrelated information, threats, libel, defamatory statements, obscenities, pornography or that violate the law are not allowed. Comments that promote commercial products or services are not allowed. Comments in violation of this policy will be removed. Continued posting of comments that violate this policy will result in the commenter being banned from the site.

By submitting your comments, you hereby give AZPM the right to post your comments and potentially use them in any other form of media operated by this institution.
Arizona Public Media broadcast stations are licensed to the Arizona Board of Regents. Arizona Public Media and AZPM are registered trademarks of the Arizona Board of Regents.
The University of Arizona